Pump Systems21 808X250 

Virtual Course
Pump Systems – Fundamentals and Energy Reduction

18th August 2021 – 6th October 2021

FIT Virtual Classroom combines e-learning with virtual facilitated workshops that are designed to bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  • Learning is delivered in ‘bite size units’ with clear learning objectives.
  • Access to e-learning modules and resources prior to commencement of each topics.
  • Interactive facilitated workshops delivered by our subject matter expert/s that are designed on scenario and problem-based training models.
  • Participate from your home or office.
  • Participants receive a certification on completion of the course.

REGISTER NOW
Registration closes Wednesday 4th August 2021.

Download Flyer here.

Course Overview

  • Multi-week Course
  • Online Modules: 4-5 hours
  • Virtual Facilitated Workshops: 4 hours

Pump Systems – Fundamentals and Energy Reduction is a mid-level course consisting of on-line modules aimed at providing an overview of fundamental principles and methods to improve the efficiency and reduce energy consumption of pump systems.

The course consists of 10 modules, 4 real time workshops and a final assessment. Each module video is 20-25 minutes in duration and is designed to review pump system fundamentals and apply them to real life applications. You can view the online modules any time prior to each workshop.

Course Presenter
Dr. Martin Atkins, Waikato University

Who Should Attend
This course will be valuable to those who need a broad understanding of pumps and pump systems including plant engineers, technical, maintenance, and operational staff who design, operate and maintain pump systems.

What You Will Learn

  • The importance of pump systems in the industry
  • Understand the common information found on pump curves.
  • To understand how to select and specify the correct pump for applications.
  • Understand and calculate the impact to life cycle costing of oversizing pumps.
  • To understand issues with operating under off-design conditions
  • Understand main flow control methods.
  • The importance of screening pump systems
  • Applications and limitations of the pump affinity laws.
  • Pump Impellor Trimming
  • Understand the situations where variable speed drives may be an option.

Martin Atkins

 

Dr Martin Atkins is a Senior Lecturer in Chemical and Process Engineering at the School of Engineering at the University of Waikato.

His general field of research is in energy systems engineering with a particular focus on developing and using Process Integration methodologies for optimising industrial energy systems and emissions reduction. He also has interests in pumping and pulp pressure screening. He has close linkages with the dairy and pulp and paper sectors.

Martin has collaborated in large research programmes examining energy and emission reduction potential in the diary and pulp and paper industries. He has close linkages with large industrial energy users and government agencies. He has been on the New Zealand Appita Section Committee for over 15 years.

 

COURSE TOPICS

Module 1: Introduction - Why pump systems matter?

Description: Pumps are an integral part of the pulp and paper making process. Reliable and efficient operation of pumping systems is critical for operability and profitability. This module will breifly introduce the importance of pump systems in the industry and provide an overview of the course. It will also introduce the concept of a pump system.

Leaning outcomes:

  • Describe the importance of pumps in the pulp and paper process
  • Explain what constitutes a pump system and identify their common elements

Module 2: Pump Curves and System Curves

Description: Understanding the system-head curve in the efficient design and operation of pump systems is just as important as understanding the pump performance curve. However, they are often poorly understood or there is a high degree of uncertainty. This module will review the information found on pump curves and outline how the system curves are calculated.

Leaning outcomes:

  • Understand the common information found on pump curves
  • Calculate a simple system curve
  • Deterimine the operating point of the pump system as changes in the operation occur

Module 3: System Requirements & Pump Selection

Description: To design and operate effective and efficent pump systems it is important to specify and select the correct pump for the application. There both hydraulic requirements (e.g. system/process requirements) as well as mechanical requirements of the pump that need to be considered.

Leaning outcomes:

  • Understand and gather the information required to specify and select
  • Correctly select and size a pump for a given situation

Module 4: How to Avoid Pump Oversizing

Description: : It is estimated that as many as 75% of industrial pumps are oversized leading to higher energy use, more capital being spent on pumps than required, and a decrease in system reliability. This module will outline how to avoid oversizing pumps and review the use of safety factors in sizing pumps. Examples will be used to illustrate the increase cost associated with oversizing pumps.

Leaning outcomes:

  • Understand and calculate the impact to life cycle costing of oversizing pumps
  • Determine and apply appropriate safety factors to sizing of pumps

Module 5: Off-Design Operation

Description: Pumps are designed to operate within a fairly narrow range for continuous operation and because a large number of pumps are overszed they are reguallry operated for long durations outside of this ideal operational window. This operation is referred to as “off-design operation” and leads to significant increases in costs in initial capital expenditure, energy, and maintenance costs. Pump reliability is severely affected by long periods of off-design operation. This module will outline what the implications are of long-term operation at off-design conditions.

Leaning outcomes:

  • Understand and describe the issues with operating under off-design conditions
  • Identify the risks to reliablilty and efficiency of off-design operations

Module 6: Introduction to Flow Control Methods

Description: There are numerous flow control methods available for pump systems and the overall efficiency of the system can be dramatically affected by the method employed. Each method has its place but selecting the appropriate method requires consideration of the system requirements and variability. Much of the inefficiencies in pump system arise from using suboptimal flow control methods and the related issue of pump oversizing. This module will review common flow control strategies and discuss the relative merits and applications of these strategies. 

Leaning outcomes:

  • Understand the main flow control methods
  • Identify the most suitable flow control methods for common situations
  • Describe the advantages and disadvantages of the different methods

Module 7: Pump Systems Assessment for Energy Reduction

Description: Pump systems are large energy users at many industrial sites and numerous studies have shown that sizable energy savings are achievable through minor and inexpensive system and pump modifications. With as many as 75% of industrial pumps being oversized it is no wonder that such opportunities exist. However due to the large number of pumping systems on most sites it can be difficult to know where to begin. This module will cover how pump systems that have energy savings opportunities can be quickly identified using pre-screening assessment techniques. Resources can then be focused on pump systems that are more likely to have the greatest returns and can form the basis for a plant-wide pump system optimisation programme.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand and describe the importance of screening pump systems for efficiency improvement
  • Develop a pump systems pre-screening assessment criteria to identify candiate systems for improvement

Module 8: Pump Affinty Laws

Description: A useful method for assessing potential savings due to impellor trimming or speed reduction are the pump affinity laws. These laws relate flow, head, and power to pump speed and impellor size. However, there are a number of important assumptions that need to be understood to correctly apply the affinity laws. This webinar will review the use of the affinity laws, outline the underlying assumptions, and use examples to illustrate how they can be used.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the application and limitations of the pump affinity laws
  • Calculate flow, head, and power conditions with changes to pump speed and impellor size using the pump affinity laws
  • Estimate modified pump curves using the pump affinity laws

Module 9: Impellor Trimming

Description: Pump impellor trimming can be a useful and cost-effective method for efficiency improvement; however it is not without risk. For example, take too much off and the pump will not provide the required heat or flowrate. This module will examine how to assess the opportunity and provide some useful guidance. The potential benefits will be illustrated with case studies.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the situations where impellor trimming might be a suitable option for energy reduction
  • Estimate the performance and potential savings of a trimmed impellor
  • Identify the risks associated with impellor trimming and appropriate mitgation stratgies

Module 10: Variable Speed Drives for Energy Reduction

Description: Pump systems are large energy users and there are many ways of reducing energy costs by reducing excess throttling or providing flow control by utilising a Variable Speed Drive (VSD).  However, depending on the situation the economics of using VSD drive may not be viable.  This module will outline the process to determine the potential benefits of VSDs on pump systems and how understanding the flow profile is critical to assessing the economics.

Learning outcomes:

  • Understand the situations where variable speed drives might be a suitable option for energy reduction
  • Develop and utilise the flow profile to estimate the performance and potential savings of a variable speed drive

COURSE SCHEDULE

Pump Systems – Fundamentals and Energy Reduction hybrid course will commence on the 18 August 2021 and conclude on the 6 October 2021.

Course requirements:

Participants will be required to review online modules prior to attending each workshop by accessing the modules on the Appita website – via your course login.

Zoom Meeting and Microsoft Teams are the main technology platforms used for this course.
Zoom Meeting will be used for interactive workshops and Microsoft Teams will be used as the course collaboration hub so that participants can interact with the trainer and other course attendees throughout the course.

MODULE

DETAILS

0 18 Aug 2021: Course Induction & Access to Modules 1-2
12:30 pm - 1:00 pm AEST / 2:30 pm to - 3:00 pm NZST
1 Introduction – Why pump systems matter?​
2 Pump Curves and System Curves
  25 Aug 2021 : Workshop 1 – Application of Modules 1 - 2
12:30 pm – 1:45 pm AEST / 2:30 pm to - 3:45 pm NZST
  27 Aug 2021 - Access to Modules 3 – 5
3 System Requirements & Pump Selection
4 How to Avoid Pump Oversizing
5 Off-design Operation
  8 Sept 2021: Workshop 2 - Application of Modules 3 - 5
12:30 pm – 1:45 pm AEST / 2:30 pm to - 3:45 pm NZST
  10 Sep 2021 - Access to Modules 6 - 7
6 Pump Flow Control Methods
7 Pump Systems Assessment for Energy Reduction
  22 Sept 2021: Workshop 3 - Application of Modules 6 - 7
12:30 pm – 1:45 pm AEST / 2:30 pm to - 3:45 pm NZST
  24 Sept 2021 - Access to Modules 8 - 10
8 Affinity Laws
9 Impellor Trimming
10 Variable Speed Drives for Energy Reduction
  6 Oct 2021: Workshop 4 - Application of Modules 8 - 10 & Course Close
12:30 pm – 1:45 pm AEST / 2:30 pm to - 3:45 pm NZST

Registration is now closed

Member: $800 + gst
Non Member: $1100 + gst

Groups of 3 or more: Contact the Appita Office.
Member: $700 + gst
Non-Member: $1000 + gst

Cancellation policy: Appita reserves the right to charge registrants a fee if they cancel after registering and making payment. For cancellations less than two weeks prior to the course a 15% cancellation fee will apply, and for less than one week prior the fee is 25%. No refund will be given for non-attendance after the course has commenced.
Disclaimer: The course outlined in this brochure is planned to be held at the time of publication of the brochure. Appita reserves the right to cancel the course or alter the contents of the course. Every attempt will be made to inform interested parties of any changes.

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